Tag Archives: Monash University

How do humans maintain their economic value in a world where artificial intelligence (AI) becomes smarter and more efficient in business?

As artificial intelligence (AI) becomes more sophisticated and human-like with each passing day, it’s never been more important for universities globally to develop critical thinking, empathy and ethics – vital skills for tomorrow’s jobs.

The rise of AI is vastly different from past developments. Traditionally, a human was still required to break down complex processes into their designated parts before determining what could be automated. AI is independent, self-sustaining, and can learn from its actions with very little human interaction.

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Espresso yourself: Coffee thoughts leave a latte on the mind

For millions of Australians, each day begins with a hot cup of coffee in order to activate our brains for the working day. The morning coffee run also acts a social lubricant, a creature comfort and, for some, a non-negotiable ritual.

But what if coffee aficionados could get the same effects from their morning latte by simply responding to cues that make them think of coffee – including the smells, sights and sounds?

New international research by Monash University and the University of Toronto has found that the placebo effect of coffee can heighten arousal, ambition and focus in regular drinkers without them actually consuming the beverage.

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Why do corporations like Boeing and VW Prematurely launch killing machines?

Professor Janek Ratnatunga is the CEO of the Institute of Certified Management Accountants and asks the question…. He has held senior appointments at the University of South Australia, Monash University, University of Melbourne, and the Australian National University in Australia; and the Universities of Washington, Richmond and Rhode Island in the USA. Prior to his academic career he worked as a chartered accountant with KPMG.   He has also been a consultant to many large Australian and international companies and to the World Bank.

Cost-benefit analyses that compare quality-cost relationships, profits, and market share with the risks of failure may be at the heart of decisions to prematurely launch products that are known to be faulty, according to Professor Janek Ratnatunga, CEO of the Institute of Certified Management Accountants (ICMA).

Professor Ratnatunga believes it is time to consider the management accounting implications, “when the faults of some of these products are so great that corporations are actually launching glorified killing machines.”

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A fine line between pleasure and weight gain

The size of your brain’s pleasure and reward processing sensors could be behind increased body fat in adolescents and potentially obesity later in life, new research by Monash University has found.

Published in Nature Scientific Reports on last month, the study results showed there was a strong link between body fat and size of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) – also known as the ‘pleasure centre’ of the brain – in adolescents.

An individual’s body fat percentage was also found to correlate with the size of their medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) – a region at the front of the brain that is involved in reward processing of food cues.
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Behaviour of Social Media similar to Drug Addicts?

The decision-making attributes of excessive social media users has been likened to those of drug addicts and gamblers in an explosive new study designed to raise awareness about the hidden mental health traps affecting young adults online. 

New research led by Michigan State University, in collaboration with Monash University and McGill University, shows the risky decision-making behaviours of social media overusers is comparable to people battling substance addiction.   Findings were published in the Journal of Behavior Addictions on Friday 11 January 2019.

Professor Antonio Verdejo-Garcia from the Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences (MICCN) and co-author of the study said their results had important societal implications.

According to the 2018 Yellow Social Media Report compiled by Sensis:
– 37% of 18-29-year-olds felt anxious when unable to access their social media accounts. – – More than one third of people now access their social media in excess of five times per day.

“Social media use is ubiquitous and continues to grow with many individuals displaying anxious and even conflictive behaviour when attempting to withdraw from these online channels,” Professor Verdejo-Garcia, the only Australian research contributor, said.  “We hope our research findings, which demonstrate a behavioural similarity between excessive social networking site use, substance use and behavioural addictive disorders, can influence the beliefs and actions of policy makers, therapists and tech industry leaders to take action against problematic online behaviour.”

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