Tag Archives: #sff19

Skin: The white supremacist who developed a conscience (Interview)

Media Screening (Maven Pictures)
Duration: 110 minutes

Having not been familiar with the story or having any preconceptions, as a viewer a vexatious undertone of sympathy toward the character pays off as we’re taken on a journey to understand how Bryon’s extreme views and violent hate has come to be.   The closing credit’s of the film at the State Theatre gave way to a round of applause from the audience.

Inspired by the remarkable true story of Bryon Widner, who endured over a year of painful operations to his face and body to remove the tattoos that tied him to his terrible past.  Skin tells a story of a a destitute young man, raised by racist skinheads and white supremacists, turns his back on hatred and violence to transform his life, with the help of a black activist and the woman he loves.

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Vai: One Character played by 9 different indigenous actresses in 7 Pacific countries

Feature Film (New Zealand)
Duration: 90 minutes

A film about female empowerment that spans the breadth of the Pacific telling the story of one woman’s life in eight separate moments from the perspective of eight different pacific island cultures.  

Vai’ is a portmanteau feature film made by 9 female Pacific filmmakers, filmed in 7 different Pacific countries: Fiji, Tonga, Solomon Islands, Kuki Airani (Cook Islands), Samoa, Niue and Aotearoa (New Zealand). It is about the journey of empowerment through culture over the lifetime of one woman, Vai, played by a different indigenous actress in each of the Pacific countries. In each of these Pacific nations ‘vai’ means water.

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One Child Nation: The consequences of a lost generation (Review)

Media Screening
Documentary (China)
Duration: 89 minutes

One Child Nation is a documentary by Gary Maddox (Amazon Studios) that sheds new light on one of international history’s most controversial family planning policies ever written into a national constitution.  It delves deeply into an upsetting period of China’s past,  taking us through the rationale of the one child policy’s genesis, the reverberations of its propaganda and post-trauma that now begins to surface across the grief-stricken generations since it ended four years ago. 

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