The drugs being tested to treat Coronavirus & mythbusters on infection risks

(Source: World Health Organisation)

WhatsApp Image 2020-03-24 at 3.26.00 PM

COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in areas with hot and humid climates

From the evidence so far, the COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in ALL AREAS, including areas with hot and humid weather.  Regardless of climate, adopt protective measures: cleaning your hands.  By doing this you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.

shutterstock_1446177758.jpg

The new coronavirus can not be transmitted through mosquito bites.

To date there has been no information nor evidence to suggest that the new coronavirus could be transmitted by mosquitoes.  The new coronavirus is a respiratory virus wh

Cold weather and snow can not kill the new coronavirus OR Taking a hot bath does not prevent the new coronavirus disease

There is no reason to believe that extreme cold or heat environments can kill the new coronavirus or other diseases.  The normal human body temperature remains around 36.5°C to 37°C, regardless of the external temperature or weather.  The most effective way to protect yourself against the new coronavirus is by frequently cleaning your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or washing them with soap and water.

ich spreads primarily through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose.   Avoid close contact with anyone who is coughing and sneezing.

Does the new coronavirus affect older people, or are younger people also susceptible?

People of all ages can be infected by the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV).   Older people, and people with pre-existing medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease) appear to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill with the virus.

Can spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body kill the new coronavirus?

No. Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body will not kill viruses that have already entered your body.  Spraying such substances can be harmful to clothes or mucous membranes (i.e. eyes, mouth). Be aware that both alcohol and chlorine can be useful to disinfect surfaces, but they need to be used under appropriate recommendations.

shutterstock_1049109149.jpg

Are hand dryers effective in killing the new coronavirus?

No.  Hand dryers are not effective in killing the 2019-nCoV.  You should frequently clean your hands and dry them thoroughly by using paper towels or a warm air dryer.

Can an ultraviolet disinfection lamp kill the new coronavirus?

UV lamps should not be used to sterilize hands or other areas of skin as UV radiation can cause skin irritation.

Can regularly rinsing your nose with saline help prevent infection with the new coronavirus?

No.  There is no evidence that regularly rinsing the nose with saline has protected people from infection with the new coronavirus.

Can eating garlic help prevent infection with the new coronavirus?

Garlic is a healthy food that may have some antimicrobial properties.  However, there is no evidence from the current outbreak that eating garlic has protected people from the new coronavirus.

shutterstock_1666947850.jpg

How effective are thermal scanners in detecting people infected with the new coronavirus?

Thermal scanners are effective in detecting people who have developed a fever (i.e. have a higher than normal body temperature) because of infection with the new coronavirus.  However, they cannot detect people who are infected but are not yet sick with fever.  This is because it takes between 2 and 10 days before people who are infected become sick and develop a fever.

Do vaccines against pneumonia protect you against the new coronavirus?

No.  Vaccines against pneumonia, such as pneumococcal vaccine and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) vaccine, do not provide protection against the new coronavirus. The virus is so new and different that it needs its own vaccine.   Although these vaccines are not effective against 2019-nCoV, vaccination against respiratory illnesses is highly recommended to protect your health.

Are antibiotics effective in preventing and treating the new coronavirus?

No, antibiotics do not work against viruses, only bacteria.  The new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a virus and, therefore, antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment.  However, if you are hospitalized for the 2019-nCoV, you may receive antibiotics because bacterial co-infection is possible.

Are there any specific medicines to prevent or treat the new coronavirus?

To date, there is no specific medicine recommended to prevent or treat the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

shutterstock_1063215047.jpg

(Source: Science Mag Kai Kupferschmidt, Jon Cohen)

The 4 drugs currently on the market being trialled as possible cures:

A drug combo already used against HIV. A malaria treatment first tested during World War II. A new antiviral whose promise against Ebola fizzled last year.

Could any of these drugs hold the key to saving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients from serious harm or death?  On Friday, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a large global trial, called SOLIDARITY, to find out whether any can treat infections with the new coronavirus for the dangerous respiratory disease.  It’s an unprecedented effort — an all-out, coordinated push to collect robust scientific data rapidly during a pandemic.  The study, which could include many thousands of patients in dozens of countries, has been designed to be as simple as possible so that even hospitals overwhelmed by an onslaught of COVID-19 patients can participate.

With about 15% of COVID-19 patients suffering from severe disease and hospitals being overwhelmed, treatments are desperately needed.   So rather than coming up with compounds from scratch that may take years to develop and test, researchers and public health agencies are looking to repurpose drugs already approved for other diseases and known to be largely safe. They’re also looking at unapproved drugs that have performed well in animal studies with the other two deadly coronaviruses, which cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

Drugs that slow or kill the novel coronavirus, called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), could save the lives of severely ill patients, but might also be given prophylactically to protect health care workers and others at high risk of infection. Treatments may also reduce the time patients spend in intensive care units, freeing critical hospital beds.

shutterstock_1190998060.jpg

Scientists have suggested dozens of existing compounds for testing, but WHO is focusing on what it says are the four most promising therapies:

  • an experimental antiviral compound called remdesivir;
  • the malaria medications chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine;
  • a combination of two HIV drugs, lopinavir and ritonavir; and
  • that same combination plus interferon-beta, an immune system messenger that can help cripple viruses.   Some data on their use in COVID-19 patients have already emerged—the HIV combo failed in a small study in China—but WHO believes a large trial with a greater variety of patients is warranted.

Enrolling subjects in SOLIDARITY will be easy.  When a person with a confirmed case of COVID-19 is deemed eligible, the physician can enter the patient’s data into a WHO website, including any underlying condition that could change the course of the disease, such as diabetes or HIV infection. The participant has to sign an informed consent form that is scanned and sent to WHO electronically.   After the physician states which drugs are available at his or her hospital, the website will randomize the patient to one of the drugs available or to the local standard care for COVID-19.

“After that, no more measurements or documentation are required,” says Ana Maria Henao Restrepo, a medical officer at WHO’s Department of Immunization Vaccines and Biologicals. Physicians will record the day the patient left the hospital or died, the duration of the hospital stay, and whether the patient required oxygen or ventilation, she says. “That’s all.”

shutterstock_1190998123.jpg

The design is not double-blind, the gold standard in medical research, so there could be placebo effects from patients knowing they received a candidate drug.  But WHO says it had to balance scientific rigor against speed.  The idea for SOLIDARITY came up less than 2 weeks ago, Henao Restrepo says, and the agency hopes to have supporting documentation and data management centers set up next week. “We are doing this in record time,” she says.


Click below to read more reviews and news on (New articles daily):

NETFLIX MYLIST   |  AMAZON PRIME  |  YOUTUBE ORIGINALSDINING  |  RECIPES  |    MUSIC  |INDEPENDENT MUSICIANS  |  FILM  |  TV  |  THEATRE  |  FASHION  |  HEALTH & FITNESS  |  TECHNOLOGY  |    FAMILY & KIDS ENTERTAINMENT  |  TRAVEL  |  MOTORING  |  RESEARCH  |  PEOPLE & BUSINESS IN THE COMMUNITY  |  SOCIAL SCENE & EVENTS  | SPOTIFY PLAYLIST
INTERVIEWS & PODCASTS

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: